Friday, February 27, 2015

A Good Day for a Serious Disease




"unequivocal evidence of immunological dysfunction in ME/CFS and diagnostic biomarkers for disease."

Dr. Mady Hornig and Dr. Ian Lipkin from Columbia University published an important paper today in Science Advances. The study can be read hereArticles  on this cytokine study appeared immediately in the Wall Street Journal and the NY Times, written by Amy Marcus and by David Tuller.  Both of these journalist have been on top of reporting on this disease for a number of years and their efforts are commendable. 

This significant study at Columbia (financed by the Hutchins Family Foundation) - along with the brain imaging of Dr. Jose Montoya at Stanford - will go a long way towards shifting the momentum in research into this serious illness - ME/CFS, otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.

From the Columbia website


We now have evidence confirming what millions of people with this disease already know, that ME/CFS isn't psychological,” states lead author Mady Hornig, MD, director of translational research at the Center for Infection and Immunity and associate professor of Epidemiology at Columbia’s Mailman School. “Our results should accelerate the process of establishing the diagnosis after individuals first fall ill as well as discovery of new treatment strategies focusing on these early blood markers." 

"This study delivers what has eluded us for so long: unequivocal evidence of immunological dysfunction in ME/CFS and diagnostic biomarkers for disease,” says senior author W. Ian Lipkin, MD, also the John Snow Professor of Epidemiology at Columbia’s Mailman School. “The question we are trying to address in a parallel microbiome project is what triggers this dysfunction."

Dr. Hornig will give a presentation on the research at Columbia at the Invest in ME conference in London at the end of May. 

7 comments:

  1. Thanks for covering this, Chris!

    As you'll have seen, this is getting a lot of media coverage. As a community, we should be jumping in on those media stories and leaving comments encouraging people to donate to research, pressure the NIH and write to congress. It's a great opportunity for outreach.

    I've been putting the Columbia donation link around when I can:

    https://giving.columbia.edu/giveonline/?schoolstyle=5881&alloc=21677

    There are commentable stories on Yahoo News, Medical Express, possibly the WSJ (I'm not a subscriber and can't see the article by Amy Dockser Marcus), and the UK Telegraph, Independent and Daily Mail.

    We can expect more today - I hope people will post comments and that we can leverage this coverage to our advantage. We can advocate and grow our research donation base at the same time!

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  2. BBC coverage:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-31644618

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