Saturday, June 3, 2017

Dr. John Chia and Enterovirus. Old hat? Nope - a key.

Recently, the 12th Invest in ME conference in London ended. This ME/CFS conference is three days of serious research discussion and presentations. It is one of the best conferences on difficult diseases. The sponsors Richard and Pia Simpson exert an extreme effort to put on this conference, a conference which expands in scope every year. These two individuals are extraordinary people.

One wonders, with all the comprehensive research at this conference, if Dr. Chia and his Enteroviral research were even mentioned at the Invest in ME conference conversations this year?

Is it possible that the low level of response to his research will continue indefinitely? Let's hope not.

Dr. John Chia knows that enteroviruses are a cause of ME/CFS.

I first met Dr. John Chia at the Invest in ME conference many years ago. Dr. Chia made a presentation on enterovirus and ME/CFS. He has made several other presentation at Invest in ME and I have written about him before, here and here and here and here.

Recently I came upon the NIH RFI request sent out this spring. Various people responded and the publication of responses can be found here. Dr. Chia's is the third response down, talking about his subject - enteroviral involvement in ME/CFS. The real question is if anyone - specifically the NIH - will pick up the thread.

Dr. Chia made a three-hour presentation on Enteroviruses at the IACFS/ME conference in the fall of 2016. In it, he makes the case that he has been making for many years now.

Dr. Chia keeps working on enteroviruses involvement in ME/CFS. He is undeterred and is committed to continue until there is a solution. In the meantime, Dr. Chia treats patients with oxymatrine. A certain percentage respond. He also uses Epivir in some cases. More recently he recommends dihydroquercitin and specifically Swanson's Russian Rejuvenator. Dihydroquercitin appears to inhibit coxsackie b4 virus and stabilizes mast cells. It has various other activities - anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, combats oxidative stress - that you can read about online. It suppresses the release of histamine.

Dr. Chia has no problem with the recent metabolome data coming from Naviaux, seeing it as a step in the process of ME/CFS. He believes that a number of drugs might modulate the cellular function in the brain but eventually the viral replication or related mechanisms will have to be inhibited. This will come with anti-virals against coxsackie B and Echo viruses. It is known that two European companies are working on a anti-viral coxsackie drug, but they keep their work very quiet. The companies working on this have extra motivation now, knowing that their market for this drug is greater than originally thought.

By sheer chance, my daughter started doing the ARUP coxsackie antibody test in 2005. Only in 2007 did I hear Dr. Chia state the importance of doing this specific test. My daughter's antibodies to CVB4 and CVB3 have been at the top of the range for ten years. To me this means something, as opposed to many other test results, which are indeterminate. I know a lot of people with ME/CFS - and a good number of doctors who try to treat it. To all of them I urge doing the coxsackie antibody test via neutralization at ARUP. Amazingly, I have yet to convince one patient or one doctor to do this test. This in itself says something - and it is not good. It appears that they just do not want to know.

More can be read on Dr. Chia and enteroviruses on the Phoenix Rising forum and another one on PR here.

There are a number of interesting responses in the NIH RFI cited above. For instance check out Dr. William Weir's response. It is the second one from the top.